Internet DRAFT - draft-xia-mipshop-fmip-multicast

draft-xia-mipshop-fmip-multicast






Network Working Group                                             F. Xia
Internet-Draft                                               B. Sarikaya
Intended status: Standards Track                              Huawei USA
Expires: September 3, 2007                                 March 2, 2007


                FMIPv6 extension for Multicast Handover
               <draft-xia-mipshop-fmip-multicast-01.txt>

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   Copyright (C) The IETF Trust (2007).














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Abstract

   FMIPv6 extends Mobile IPv6 for reducing handover delays.  But it does
   not deal with the scenario that an MN joins multicast trees using
   it's CoA in a visited link.  The document proposes an extension to
   FMIPv6 to handle local multicast traffic during handover.


Table of Contents

   1.  Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  3
   2.  Terminology  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   3.  Problem Statement  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
   4.  Operation of Multicast Fast Handover . . . . . . . . . . . . .  4
     4.1.  Predictive Fast Handover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  5
     4.2.  Reactive Fast Handover . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
     4.3.  Handover Latency Analysis  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  6
   5.  New Options  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
     5.1.  Multicast Group Information Option . . . . . . . . . . . .  7
   6.  Security Considerations  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  8
   7.  Conclusions  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
   8.  References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
     8.1.  Normative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
     8.2.  Informative References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  9
   Authors' Addresses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10
   Intellectual Property and Copyright Statements . . . . . . . . . . 11

























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1.  Introduction

   [MULTICASTPS] specifies the problem scope for a multicast mobility
   management.  The attempt is made to subdivide the various challenges
   according to their originating aspects and to present existing
   proposals for solution.  There are two general multicast mobility
   problems, that is, Multicast Source Mobility and Multicast Listener
   Mobility.  This draft only deals with the latter.

   The mobility support for IPv6 protocol [MIP] has specified two basic
   methods for mobile multicast:

   1.  via a bi-directional tunnel from a MN to its Home Agent.  The MN
       uses its home address to send MLD(Multicast Listener Discovery)
       messages.  The MLD messages are tunneled to its Home Agent.

   2.  via a local multicast router on the foreign link being visited.
       the MN MUST use its care-of address when sending MLD packets

   Fast Mobile IPv6 [FMIPv6] extends Mobile IPv6 for reducing handover
   delays.  But it does not deal with the scenario that an MN joins
   multicast trees using it's CoA in a visited link.  The scenario
   occurs in emerging mobile IPTV deployments.  This draft proposes an
   elaborate way to handle the problem, that is, in handover
   preparation, a PAR informs a NAR to build related multicast deliver
   trees; during handover, the NAR buffers multicast traffic; after
   handover, The NAR sends the buffered traffic as soon as possible.
   These benefits can be achieved through extension of Fast Handover for
   Mobile IPv6 [FMIPv6]

   The document continues in Section 2 to define the terminology used
   and then Section 3 states the problem, Section 4 defines the protocol
   operation, Section 5 introduces a new option, Section 6 discusses the
   security considerations.  Finally, Section 7 concludes the document.

















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2.  Terminology

   The key words "MUST", "MUST NOT", "REQUIRED", "SHALL", "SHALL NOT",
   "SHOULD", "SHOULD NOT", "RECOMMENDED", "MAY", and "OPTIONAL" in this
   document are to be interpreted as described in BCP 14 [STANDARDS].

   The terminology in this document is based on the definitions in
   [FMIPv6], in addition to the ones specified in this section

   Local Multicast Traffic: Multicast traffic delivered to an MN not
   through the MN's HA.  In this case the MN joins multicast trees using
   it's CoA.  But in fact, the MN joins multicast group using local link
   address as source address [MLDv2] not CoA, but it does not affect the
   problem statement and solution proposed in this document


3.  Problem Statement

   FMIPv6 extends Mobile IPv6 for reducing handover delays.  But it does
   not deal with the scenario that an MN joins multicast trees using
   it's CoA in a visited link when handover occurs.  There are two
   problems in this scenario.  One is that PAR can't deliver temporarily
   multicast traffic to the MN at NAR during handover, because PAR has
   no idea about the MN's multicast membership.  This could be handled
   by a small extension of FMIPv6 proposed in this document.  The second
   problem is how to prevent multicast joins and this needs to be
   addressed with other context transfer [RFC4067] which is out of the
   memo's scope .


4.  Operation of Multicast Fast Handover

   In Multicast Fast Handover (MFH), the mobile node joins multicast
   groups such as IPTV sessions using its care-of address (CoA).

   MFH extends FMIPv6 signaling as follows:

   1.  An MN sends FBU message with Multicast Group Information to
       notify PAR tunneling related multicast traffic to NAR .
   2.  PAR sends HI message with Multicast Group Information to notify
       NAR establishing related multicast deliver trees in advance.
   3.  PAR tunnels all multicast packets to NAR.

   We explain MFH operation for the predictive and reactive fast
   handover modes of FMIPv6.






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4.1.  Predictive Fast Handover

                 MN                    PAR                  NAR
                  |                     |                    |
                  |------RtSolPr------->|                    |
                  |<-----PrRtAdv--------|                    |
                  |                     |                    |
                  |------FBU----------->|--------HI--------->|
                  |                     |<------HAck---------|
                  |          <--FBack---|--FBack--->         |
                  |                     |                    |
               disconnect             forward                |
                  |                   packets===============>|
                  |                     |                    |
                  |                     |                    |
              connect                   |                    |
                  |                     |                    |
                  |--------- FNA --------------------------->|
                  |<=================================== deliver packets
                  |                                          |

                    Figure 1: Predictive Fast Handover

   Figure 1 is characterized as "predictive" mode of operation.

   1.  With interaction of RtSolPr and PrRtAdv, the MN formulates a
       prospective NCoA and learns some information about the NAR.
   2.  The purpose of the FBU is to authorize PAR to bind PCoA to NCoA,
       so that arriving packets can be tunneled to the new location of
       MN.  Upon receiving FBU, PAR sends HI message.  FBU and HI
       include Multicast Group Information Option (MGIO).  The option
       which is defined in Section 5.1 consists of the multicast groups
       that the MN is a member of and other related information needed
       in [MLDv2].
   3.  If NAR already has the state for the multicast groups in MGIO, no
       action is required.  Otherwise, NAR constructs new multicast
       delivery trees for any new multicast group.  For example, in
       PIM-SM [PIM-SM], On receiving the MN's expression of interest,
       NAR then sends a PIM Join message towards a router which is the
       root of the non-source-specific distribution tree for the
       multicast group.  The Join message travels hop-by-hop towards the
       root router for the group, and in each router it passes through,
       multicast tree state for the group is instantiated
   4.  When HAck message is received, the PAR MUST deliver all the
       traffic , unicast and multicast traffic, to NAR for buffering
       through the established tunnel.





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   5.  Once FNA is received, the NAR delivers all the buffered packets
       to the MN.
   6.  On finishing IPv6 network attachment, the MN initiates multicast
       signaling procedure using its new CoA.  At the same time, the MN
       receives buffered multicast traffic from the NAR and tunneled
       traffic from the PAR.  When multicast delivery trees are
       constructed, the PAR stops delivering multicast traffic to MN
       while the NAR delivers multicast traffic directly.

4.2.  Reactive Fast Handover

                 MN                    PAR                  NAR
                  |                     |                    |
                  |------RtSolPr------->|                    |
                  |<-----PrRtAdv--------|                    |
                  |                     |                    |
               disconnect               |                    |
                  |                     |                    |
                  |                     |                    |
               connect                  |                    |
                  |------FNA[FBU]-------|------------------->|
                  |                     |<-----FBU-----------|
                  |                     |------FBack-------->|
                  |                   forward                |
                  |                   packets===============>|
                  |                     |                    |
                  |<=================================== deliver packets
                  |                                          |

                     Figure 2: Reactive Fast Handover

   Figure 2 is characterized as "reactive" mode of operation.  An MN
   MUST include Multicast Group Information Option in FBU which is
   encapsulated in FNA.  Once receiving FBU, the PAR establishes a
   tunnel to MN and delivers related multicast traffic to the MN.  At
   the same time, the MN initiates multicast signaling with NCoA in the
   visited network.  Once the NAR has constructed related multicast
   deliver trees the NAR delivers multicast traffic directly.

4.3.  Handover Latency Analysis

   When an MN moves from one AR to another AR, the overall multicast
   handover consists of link layer(L2) delays, network layer(L3)
   attachment delays, and multicast signaling delays:

   HO time = L2 delay + L3 network attachment delays + multicast
   signaling delays.




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   FMIPv6 reduces HO time especially in predictive mode.  L2 delay is
   unavoidable, while buffering related multicast traffic in an NAR can
   reduce the affect of a handover delay.  IPv6 network attachment
   commonly includes activities such as default router discovery, CoA
   configuration and its DAD.  Through RtSolPr and PrRtAdv interactions,
   an MN can finish the network attachment before link layer handover.
   Multicast signaling consists of joining multicast groups and
   constructing multicast delivery trees.  Through tunnel between a PAR
   and a NAR, older delivery trees can be used before new delivery trees
   are constructed.


5.  New Options

   This draft introduces one new option.

5.1.  Multicast Group Information Option

   One or more Multicast Group Information Options SHOULD be included in
   the message FBU and HI.































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       0                   1                   2                   3
       0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |      Type     |    Length     | Record Type   | Reserved      |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                          Reserved                             |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                                                               |
      +                                                               +
      |                                                               |
      +                          Multicast Address                    +
      |                                                               |
      +                                                               +
      |                                                               |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
      |                                                               |
      +                                                               +
      |                                                               |
      +                         Source Address [1]                    +
      |                                                               |
      .                               .                               .
      |                                                               |
      +                         Source Address [N]                    +
      |                                                               |
      +                                                               +
      |                                                               |
      +-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

               Figure 3: Multicast Group Information Option

   Type: TBD

   Length: The size of this option in 8 octets.  The option is variable

   Reserved: MUST be set to zero

   Record Type: refer to section 5.2.5 in [MLDv2].

   Multicast Address: the multicast group address

   Source Address: a vector of N unicast addresses of the senders of
   this multicast group.


6.  Security Considerations

   This memo is based on FMIPv6, and no additional messages are defined.
   No additional threats are introduced.  For a more analysis, see



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   related section. [FMIPv6]


7.  Conclusions

   We presented a simple extension to FMIPv6 to transfer local multicast
   traffic of an MN from PAR to NAR during handover.  We also defined a
   new option to be used in FMIPv6 messages.


8.  References

8.1.  Normative References

   [FMIPv6]   Ed., R., "Fast Handovers for Mobile IPv6", RFC 4068,
              July 2005, <ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc4068>.

   [MIP]      Johnson, D., Perkins, C., and J. Arkko, "Mobility Support
              in IPv6", RFC 3775, June 2004,
              <ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc3775>.

   [MLDv2]    Vida, R. and L.  Costa, "Multicast Listener Discovery
              Version 2 (MLDv2) for IPv6", RFC 3810, June 2004,
              <ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc3810>.

   [PIM-SM]   Fenner, B., Handley, M., Holbrook, H., and I.  Kouvelas,
              "Protocol Independent Multicast - Sparse Mode (PIM-SM):
              Protocol Specification (Revised)", RFC 4601, August 2006,
              <ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc4601>.

   [STANDARDS]
              Bradner, S., "Key words for use in RFCs to Indicate
              Requirement Levels", RFC 2119, March 1997,
              <ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc2119>.

8.2.  Informative References

   [MULTICASTPS]
              Schmidt, Thomas C. and Matthias. Waehlisch, "Multicast
              Mobility in MIPv6: Problem Statement", March 2007,
              <draft-schmidt-mobopts-mmcastv6-ps-02.txt>.

   [RFC4067]  Loughney, J., Nakhjiri, M., Perkins, C., and R. Koodli,
              "Context Transfer Protocol (CXTP)", July 2005,
              <ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc4067>.






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Authors' Addresses

   Frank Xia
   Huawei USA
   1700 Alma Dr. Suite 100
   Plano, TX  75075

   Phone: +1 972-509-5599
   Email: xiayangsong@huawei.com


   Behcet Sarikaya
   Huawei USA
   1700 Alma Dr. Suite 100
   Plano, TX  75075

   Phone: +1 972-509-5599
   Email: bsarikaya@huawei.com

































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