Internet DRAFT - draft-frost-tictoc-management

draft-frost-tictoc-management



TICTOC                                                       Tim Frost,
Internet Draft                                               Greg Dowd,
Intended status: Informational                        Symmetricom, Inc.
Expires: January 5, 2011
                                                       Laurent Montini,
                                                          Cisco Systems

                                                           July 5, 2010


       Management Requirements for Packet-based Timing Distribution
                   draft-frost-tictoc-management-00.txt


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   Section 4.e of the Trust Legal Provisions and are provided without
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Abstract

   This Internet draft investigates the management aspects associated
   with packet-based distribution of time and frequency using protocols
   such as PTP (Precision Time Protocol, [1]).  It explores some of the
   issues that need to be solved in connection with the management of
   synchronization distribution.

Table of Contents

   1. Introduction...................................................2
     1.1. Elements of synchronization management ....................3
     1.2. Use of a single synchronization management domain .........3
   2. Issues to be resolved..........................................3
     2.1. What information must be maintained by synchronization
          functions? ................................................4
     2.2. What performance data related to the timing flow are to
          be collected? .............................................4
     2.3. What alarms must be generated by synchronization
          functions? ................................................4
     2.4. How is the management data to be collected? ...............5
     2.5. Identification of network elements containing
          synchronization functions .................................5
   3. Security Considerations........................................5
   4. IANA Considerations............................................6
   5. Acknowledgements...............................................6
   6. Informative References.........................................7
   Author's Addresses................................................7

1. Introduction

   Synchronization for many telecoms applications (e.g. wireless
   basestations, circuit emulation services) is a mission-critical
   service, in the sense that if the synchronization service goes out
   of tolerance, the enabled service may fail, impacting revenue.  When
   the synchronization is delivered by a packet-based mechanism (e.g.
   by use of PTP defined in [1]), continuous in-service monitoring is
   required to verify the quality and traceability of the
   synchronization.

   The purpose of this draft is to examine some of the requirements of
   synchronization management and to propose options for how these
   issues may be tackled.  It has been developed out of the informal
   "Problem Statement for Management of Synchronization Networks"
   presented at IETF 77.


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1.1. Elements of synchronization management

   Elements in effective management and monitoring for packet-based
   synchronization distribution include:

   o  Fault monitoring and reporting

   o  Performance and status monitoring of the synchronization
      equipment

   o  Performance and status monitoring of the packet network related
      to timing distribution

   Analysis of the performance data for trends in key synchronization
   performance indicators may allow "early warning" of possible issues
   (e.g. congestion) that may affect synchronization.  Continuous, in-
   service monitoring enables the operator to be informed of events or
   trends likely to affect the synchronization network and enable
   corrective action to be taken.

1.2. Use of a single synchronization management domain

   Whilst distributed across the network, and possibly embedded into
   disparate network elements, synchronization forms a distinct
   infrastructural function within the network.  This means it needs to
   be planned and managed as an entity, and not as collection of
   separate components.

   The aggregation of synchronization information and processing of it
   as an integrated whole can provide powerful insights into the
   overall performance of the synchronization service, and indicate if
   more general corrective action is required.  For example,
   degradation in the key performance indicators of several
   synchronization network elements may be an early warning sign of
   increased network loading.

   Use of specific synchronization node manager can enhance such
   holistic management of the synchronization function.  It also
   simplifies the integration of the synchronization management into an
   operator's OSS (Operations and Support System), by providing a
   single point of integration with visibility of the whole network,
   including the synchronization service, and allowing correlation of
   information from multiple network information.

2. Issues to be resolved

   Some of the issues that need to be resolved in the creation of a
   coherent approach to synchronization management include:


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   o  What information must be maintained by synchronization functions?

   o  What performance data related to synchronization are to be
      collected?

   o  What alarms must be generated by synchronization functions?

   o  How is the management information to be collected?

   o  How can network elements containing synchronization functions be
      discovered?

   These issues are discussed in the following sections.

2.1. What information must be maintained by synchronization functions?

   A standard set of "synchronization information" should be defined,
   such that all synchronization functions are able to report the same
   types of information.  This should include node information related
   to timing and synchronization, protocol-specific information (e.g.
   for PTP-based functions, the standard data sets) and timing
   performance data, enabling a synchronization network manager to
   assess the health of a synchronization node.

   The standard set of information should be defined in terms of a MIB
   (Management Information Base) for each type of synchronization
   function (e.g. packet master or slave clock, or "on-path" timing
   support elements).

2.2. What performance data related to the timing flow are to be
   collected?

   A standard set of information relating to the quality and
   performance of the timing packet flow will enable a synchronization
   network manager to assess the health of a individual timing path and
   of the synchronization network as a whole.

   The standard set of information could be defined in terms of a IPFIX
   Information Model using IPFIX protocol for collecting the
   information from various nodes.

2.3. What alarms must be generated by synchronization functions?

   Similarly, a standard set of alarms for synchronization functions
   should be defined.  These should include conventional alarm criteria
   such as input signal failure, as well as more specific packet-based
   synchronization criteria, such as the PTSF conditions defined in the
   ITU-T's Telecom Profile [2].


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2.4. How is the management data to be collected?

   Another consideration is how the data are to be collected.  This may
   be dependent on the equipment in which the synchronization functions
   are embedded, the type of information, and the operator's own
   management strategy.  Some potential options include:

   o  through a management channel in the synchronization flow (e.g.
      PTP management messages), to a synchronization network manager

   o  through a management channel distinct from the synchronization
      flow (e.g. SNMP or IPFIX protocols)

   o  through the element management system of a network element
      containing a synchronization function, and then northbound into
      the OSS

   o  through the element management system of a network element
      containing a synchronization function, and then northbound into a
      synchronization network manager

2.5. Identification of network elements containing synchronization
   functions

   One of the main issues is to identify network elements containing
   synchronization functions.  A synchronization network management
   system can only manage devices that it knows exist, and in a large
   network, it may be difficult to discover which network elements
   contain synchronization functions.

   This identification process is not strictly speaking a management
   function, but it is relevant and necessary to enable on-going
   synchronization management.  Some options for identification of
   synchronization functions include:

   o  synchronization function identifies itself to a pre-configured
      synchronization management node on startup

   o  synchronization masters or servers maintain a list of their
      currently serviced slaves/clients, and make the list available
      for the synchronization network manager to query.

3.  Security Considerations

   Security aspects of the above options will need to be considered in
   more detail.




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4.  IANA Considerations

   No IANA actions are required as a result of the publication of this
   document.

5.  Acknowledgements

   The authors wish to thank Sanjay Mani (Symmetricom) for his
   invaluable comments.

   This document was prepared using 2-Word-v2.0.template.dot.







































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6. Informative References

   [1]   IEEE, "Standard for A Precision Clock Synchronization Protocol
         for Networked Measurement and Control Systems", IEEE1588-2008.

   [2]   "ITU-T PTP Profile for Frequency distribution without timing
         support from the network ", Draft Recommendation G.8265.1
         (work in progress), TD-PLEN-0255-R1, June 2010

Author's Addresses

   Tim Frost,
   Symmetricom Inc.,
   2300 Orchard Parkway,
   San Jose,
   CA 95131,
   USA.
   Email: tfrost@symmetricom.com


   Greg Dowd,
   Symmetricom Inc.,
   2300 Orchard Parkway,
   San Jose,
   CA 95131,
   USA.
   Email: gdowd@symmetricom.com


   Laurent Montini,
   Cisco Systems,
   11, rue Camille Desmoulins,
   92782 Issy-les-Moulineaux,
   France.
   Email: lmontini@cisco.com















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